April 23, 2014

Why the guard dogs aren’t recommended to beginners?

Question by : Why is it all the guard dogs that aren’t recommended to beginner dog owners?
It seems like all the breeds that have protective instincts are the ones that aren’t for beginner dog owners, and the nonguard dogs, are the ones that are recommended to beginner owners. Why is this??? I mean the only difference is, they protect you and the others don’t. So then why is it that people say guard dogs aren’t for beginners??? I REALLY want to know.

Thanks. : ) All answers are appreciated.

Quick answer:

Answer by finnigan
because the average new dog owner can barely housebreak a dog so to give a stronger breed with protective instincts to a new owner with no experience with dogs is dangerous … and i think if you have to ask this you clearly lack experience with dogs … if a small lap dog is screwed up the family most often still keeps the dog, and the consequences will most often be minimal … screw up a strong breed, and the consequences can be severe … and guess what shelters are then full of, screwed up large breed dogs … dogs people bought attracted to the look and power but no clue how to train, so dog ends up screwed up, owner can not manage, and off the pound it goes …

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Comments

  1. ✯Love✯ is a Germ says:

    Breeds known as "guard dogs" by most aren't REALLY "guard" dogs, these are just breeds more prone to be weary of strangers.

    These also tend to be EXTREMELY intelligent breeds that can also be extremely hard to train OR even aggressive if not handled by the right person. If you've never owned a dog before, don't really know how to train a dog, don't know much about dog body language, and you buy that poorly bred BYB german shepherd from the news paper, and it's fear aggressive, you are probably NOT going to know how to handle the situation. And then you are going to have serious problems on your hands when you have a 100lb animal you can't control that is trying to eat everyone.

    On the other hand, a 50 lb golden retriever is probably going to love everyone. Even if it is a neurotic mess that is hard to train, at least it's not chowing down on the neighborhood kids.

    That being said, I wanted a GSD for ten years, a breed that is said to NOT be for beginners, I studied up for 10 years, and the first dog I ever owned and the only breed I've owned has been the GSD.

    They shouldn't say "not for beginners". Because a beginner can be a great handler. They should say "NOT FOR STUPID PEOPLE". Of course, stupid people never admit they're stupid, so not for beginners is just easier.

  2. There is a HELL of a difference! Rotties, GSDs, and Dobies, will RUN YOU over if given the chance. They are headstrong and the slightest mistake could result in you having a disobedient monster on your hands. They need strong, but patient training, and from my experience get bored quite easily. It's not recommended to get one for first time owners, because they already dont know what the heck their doing, they also have a potential weapon.

  3. LabxRottweiler! says:

    Guard dogs are usually big, powerful, dominant, and may be harder to train without experience.
    Without training they can become a menace.

    Guard dogs are great though! I love Brazilian Mastiffs….

  4. Rayven ~ SCAdian gir says:

    Actually there is a hell of a lot more difference than just that. Also no dog is a "guard" dog unless it has been bred/trained for the task. A GSD is just a GSD at the end of the day. A GSD with the right temperament and training however has the potential to be a guard dog.

    Any way the reason is the same reason why most breeds with high prey drives are also not for first timers. First time dog owner lack the experience and knowledge to handle these dogs. Are there exceptions to that? Sure people who have applied themselves into their breed education and have a plan for training etc. Unfortunately that exception does to extend to the average person. look at how many people find housebreaking and leash training a trail? Now pile up smart, and strong willed with that and you've got the recipe for a problem dog and an owner with no clue what to do.

  5. Helen Rempel says:

    Because the basis of most guard dogs is controlled aggression. A first-time dog owner usually doesn't know how to manage/train that properly, and can end up with an animal that bites themselves or others when it's not supposed to.

    I think if you ask most any dog owner, we'll all tell you we made mistakes with our very first dogs. We learned from those mistakes, and the dogs we've had since have benefited from the experience we've acquired.

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