Are Siberian Huskies known to be aggressive or vicious?

x3: Are Siberian Huskies good dogs?
Are they known to be aggressive or vicious? I have always LOVED them. I thought they looked amazing, but I’m not so sure on how they are with people.

I guess you can say I kind of have a “fear” of dogs ever since my father bought a German Shepherd and it was extremely vicious. It attacked me a few times, so that’s why I’m asking this question. My mother wants another dog and I suggested a Siberian Husky, but I don’t want one if they’re known for being aggressive or anything like that. I know it depends on the actual dog and whether or not it was trained properly, but if anybody has anything to say about them, that would be nice.

Thanks in advance
Yeah, our German Shepherd was vicious thanks to my dad. He wanted a guard dog and he got one… except the only person the dog guards is my father.

Siberian Huskies photo

Photo Credit: Jeffrey Beall/Flickr

Answers and Views:

Answer by tomo
i have always wanted a siberian husky and two factors put me off. one being that they are not good off the lead and tend to be very independent so if they want to run off they will. another factor was that they have known to chase and ven kill cats. as i have cats and will probably want more in the future this was a big no no.
that said im sure if the dog was brought up with them it would have been fine. all dogs can be vicious if not brought up properly. the german shepherd you were referring to probably wasnt socialised at an early age which all dogs need to be. my german shepherd was a real softie! you need to socialise the dog early, take him/her to classes and get him/her used to cats, other small animals, children, dogs as you would with all other dogs.
they are beautiful animals but need training!

ADDED

to the top contributor (YMRNR MOM) im sorry but ive got to disagree. any dog can be good as your first dog as long as you understand the basics and do all of your research. you need to understand the importance of classes and hard work that comes with the dog.
and as for ‘try something easier like a lab’ isnt really a good idea. that makes an assumption that you dont have to do any work and that they are miracle dogs making the best family pet without any training. i own two labs, i know from experience that they settle down around the age of four, chew everything and anything from walls to shoes to floors. they shed A LOT they need tons of exercise and need training! one of mine has turned 16 months and is STILL being taken to classes as i want him to be well socialised. i was well prepared before i got labs but to tell you the truth i would have a german shepherd again anyday!!!

to the asker— as long as you research the breed you want thoroughly, make sure that breed suits your lifestyle and you are prepared to put in the training and time for this dog for its whole life then there is no reason why you shouldnt have a husky.

Answer by lovethem;)
They can be very aggressive. They are kind of like chows. They need lots of exercise and they can be ‘vicious’ its known in the breed.

have any questions ask

PS: do some research on them.

Answer by Dogs and Death Metal
aggression isn’t something found in a breed, its something found in an idividual

as for Huskies, they need a strong person, as a leader and tons of exercise/stimulation

Answer by YMRNR Mom
If you have never owned a dog before and you are looking for a Husky to be your first dog, DON’T. Yes, Huskies if not properly trained can become very aggressive, especially if you are not the dogs pack leader. The pack leader status must be taken from day one and maintained throughout this dogs life or they will take over and you won’t like when they do.

Huskies are very big shedders so if you are looking for a low maintenance animal, this is not it. They require tons of exercise and failure to provide this dog with enough will result in a very destructive and bored husky.

Husky’s and Pits seem to be the popular breed at my dog park, every husky I’ve met have been wonderful dogs, but rather aloof with people, they aren’t your cuddly I love people type dogs they tend to be rather independent thinkers and independent dogs. My friend has a husky and in all the time I’ve known her Sammy has probably allowed me to pet him only a handful of times, not because he’s aggressive far from it, but because he’s a snob…and not a cuddly type dog.

Pesonally from what I’ve heard and read, a husky is not a good breed for first time dog owners. Try something easier like a Lab.

Good luck

Add: @Tomo: Huskies do like to hunt but my friend has 7 cats and one husky and he does not bother the cats at all, in fact the Cats tend to “groom” sammy, she had some of the cats prior to getting him when he was nearly 3 and some cats came after she got the dog and he’s great with all of them so it is possible to have both.

Answer by Sibe mum. Plus a BC!
Siberian Huskies are not at all people aggressive by nature. Small dogs and small animals are a different story. They don’t have any of the “guard dog” characteristics that a GSD does. The only thing “scary” about them is their wolf-like appearance. They are great dogs, or I wouldn’t have 3!

They require a home which will provide adequate exercise daily. We spent about 2 hours this morning at the park with a friend, and then came home for a 2 hour swimming session. They are sleeping quietly in the other room in Sibe Swirls. If not exercised, they can be a living hell. Eating walls, destroying couches, escaping out of the house and playing “catch me” for 2 hours. They are a headstrong and stubborn breed, you need to know how to put your foot down. They are not for the “inexperienced” dog owner.

ETA:
Just to clarify (and save some potential feline lives) a Sibe who has never grown up with a cat will 9 times out of 10 chase and kill it. My dogs are fine with the cats because i’ve gotten my Sibes young enough for them to understand to respect it before their prey drive really kicked in. They must be watched and i’d never leave them loose together in the house without being throughly exercised. A Sibe who totally accepts a cat as an adult without prior cat socialization is a minority, rare, and should not be expected.

Answer by Aphrodite ☼Dobe walks 4 Bullies
Sounds like your dad has no idea how to handle a dog. You cannot go out and try to make a dog a guard dog yourself – a real guard dog is worth THOUSANDS of dollars due to the strict breeding and training.

If I were you – I would try and deter your family from getting another dog. Your dad will be able to make any breed vicious/aggressive if he was able to with the GSD. The only one that really ends up suffering is the dog because the dog always loses once it makes contact with human flesh – and you have your dad to blame for that.

Answer by Jasmer
The Siberian Husky has a WONDERFUL temperament. They get along great with just about anybody. However, there are several things about the breed that many people don’t realize before getting one, and they often wind up on the streets or in shelters.

1.) The Siberian Husky is a hardcore working dog. Even the show-line only dogs have a very strong working drive. The husky that does not is an exception, not the rule. They have a strong desire to run, and run, and run, and can be difficult to leash train. They are deceptively strong for their size. They cannot be trusted off leash, at all, ever unless they are in a securely fenced area. Recall training rarely works with huskies.

2.) They require an obscene amount of exercise. The siberian husky that is content to lie about the house quietly is rare. They were bred to pull light loads for upwards of 20 miles or more in a 24 hour period, and as such require a lot of exercise. If you aren’t willing to take up at least a one hour long run or bike ride with this dog every single day, it is not the dog for you.

3.) They are notoriously difficult to train. The siberian husky, like most spitz breeds, is a serious working dog. An innate stubbornness, confidence, and decision-making ability is paramount to a good sled dog, and as such many huskies possess these traits. They are willful and will walk all over you if given a chance. They take advantage of any lax in leadership. Again, a husky that does not do this is more the exception, not the rule. Proper training will make an excellent companion, but consistent, firm training is a must.

4.) They are notorious escape artists. As I said, they were bred to run run run! They can dig out under the fence and they can easily scale a fence up to 6′. Some will climb a higher fence. If you intend to leave the dog outside at any time unattended then a securely fenced yard is a must. If they can get out, they will, and take off to run and snoop. More often than not they are picked up by animal control, a benevolent stranger, or are never seen by the owner again. A heavy wire buried 2-3 inches underneath the fence line will discourage digging.

5.) They are notoriously destructive. A bored dog is a destructive dog and the siberian husky has this down to an art. They often dig, chew, howl, destroy furniture, yard fixtures, drywall, you name it. Fail to exercise this dog properly and you may wind up pulling your hair out in frustration and replacing half your home.

You cannot yell at or hit a sibe, they do not respond well to negative punishment. They are likely to bite or just take off if it happens. They require at minimum one hour of intense physical exercise every day, ran or shine, without fail to be truly happy and well-adjusted. They must be socialized extensively with children and small animals as they have a very, very high prey drive. They usually see cats and even small dogs as toys or prey and will chase and kill them. Occasionally a child may also trigger the prey drive if the dog has not been properly socialized. As with all dogs, it should be supervised with children. They blow their coat twice a year–this means it falls out in large clumps twice a year, all over your house, so get a good heavy-duty vacuum. :P

Google NILIF training and research the breed thoroughly. dogbreedinfo.com has some good information on the breed.

[Add] The Siberian Husky is not an aggressive breed by nature. They can be made aggressive, but they are not inherently so. They also can be socialized with cats and do very well with them. I’ve known huskies who ate cats and some who don’t. The ones who don’t were brought up as pups around cats and kittens. My own rescue husky was a cat eater when I got him, and quickly learned what “no cats” meant. :P

As somebody else mentioned they can be aloof toward strangers, or they may be very friendly and happy to greet them. There is almost no loyalty in a husky, though. They’ll often times wander off with anybody who has food, a leash, or a car so they can go on another adventure. They must be watched closely for this reason. Their friendliness, ambiguous loyalties, and desire to go out on a new adventure at every waking moment is what makes them so frequently and easily stolen.

[Add] And if you don’t have a fence and wish to instead tie the dog outside for a little while each day, don’t. They can snap those long cable leads with supernatural ease. Mine snapped two cable tie-outs, a thick leather collar, and two nylon leads. Not the clasps, but the cables and nylon themselves!

Read other answers in the comments.

What do you think?

Comments

  1. Nook says

    You can train them not to be destructive but the personality comes with the dog but they are mainly a loving dog

  2. freshprince says

    FYI, headlines have hit the news today about dogs killing a 3 week old baby in Canada – the dogs were huskies. Not blaming the breed generically, as the mother left the infant alone with the dogs while she went outside to smoke – that’s a dangerous thing to do with many breeds – but I wonder if the intense prey drive described here by many posters might have been a contributing factor.

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